Authors Increasing Fans With Content

You are going to hear this phrase quite a bit, “Content is king.” Marketing agencies are now hiring content writers, because this has become the most important marketing tool for businesses.

In fact, just about every business is adding content employees to write for their website, newsletter, blogs, social media posts, and product description. If you are looking to earn some extra money writing content, here is a list of job titles that you can search for:

Content Marketing Writer

Custom Publishing Writer

Custom Media Writer

Corporate Content Writer

Custom Content Writer

Branded Editorial Content Writer

Advertising Content Writer

Info-Content Writer

For an author, increasing fans is now done using content. Think about all the places you write something:

Your book

Description of your book (In several places)

Website

Blogs

Social Media

Emails

Queries

eNewsletters

Decide if you are going to use your content as a personal outlet, or as an author. You cannot have it both ways. If you want to use content to increase fans, then ask yourself these three questions, every single time you write a Facebook post, a Tweet, write a blog, or mention something on your website:

“Does this content relate to my target audience?”

“Will this content interest or help my target audience?”

“Does this content have a chance to be forwarded to others?”

Every single time you write a sentence for the world to see, it should relate, interest, and help your target audience, along with having the chance to be forwarded to others. No exceptions.

Nothing Personal

For example, let’s say you are a romance author and posted this on Facebook: “I’m heading to Starbucks and then to my other job. Hopefully I’ll be home this afternoon to get some writing done.”

Did this content relate to your target audience? Did this content interest or help your target audience? Does this content have a chance to be forwarded to others?

No. No. And…no.

If you are a romance author, maybe you could write a blog, “Ten Inexpensive Romantic Evenings.” Then, you can make a post on Facebook and Tweet each suggestion individually. After all, you are an expert in romance. That is why your books are so great!

Did this content relate to your target audience? Yes. Did this content interest or help your target audience? Yes. Does this content have a chance to be forwarded to others? Yes.

Keep Opinions to Yourself

Let’s say you write fantasy children’s books and you wrote this, “I think bibles should be read in public schools.”

If you have a reader that was offended by that statement, then you just lost a reader. The only way your opinion counts, is if the content directly relates to your target audience. If you are a children’s Christian author and said, “I think bibles should be read in public schools,” your fans would appreciate that.

Link Your Name with the Best

In this next example, let’s say you are a horror writer. A great post would be, “I just read Bag of Bones by Stephen King. If you haven’t read it, I suggest you do!”

There is nothing wrong with promoting another author. It shows that you are knowledgeable in your genre. Most importantly, your name is linked to a great author. There is no way that anyone can read that post without seeing your name next to Stephen King.

But let’s put that post to the test. Did this content relate to your target audience? Yes. Your target audience is fans of horror books. Did this content interest or help your target audience? Your horror fans are certainly aware of Stephen King. Your suggestion for the book is either agreeable to the target audience, or you gave them a great suggestion to read in the future. Does this content have a chance to be forwarded to others? First of all, other horror authors will forward this content, for the same reason you wrote it: Because their name will be linked with Stephen King. (And you!) Fans of horror may or may not forward, but it certainly will have a good chance.

Are You Having a Bad Day? So What?

Facebook is a great place for people to vent. Is not a great place for authors to vent. Never. Never. Never.

Let’s say you write young adult books and posted this message: “I am sick of guys sending me messages on Facebook and hitting on me! I am married! Can’t they read!”

Ugg…

Did this content relate to your target audience? Maybe some of your female readers might agree, but you just lost all male readers and the women that like messages from guys. Did this content interest or help your target audience? Not one thing you said was helpful to anyone. Does this content have a chance to be forwarded to others? Sure it does. But then you will lose all future male readers and women that like flirty messages from guys. You just became a niche author with one post.

If you are a young adult author, maybe you could address how to take safety measures on Facebook while mentioning that both young women and young men can be harmed by a Facebook stalker. That relates to your target audience, it helps your target audience, and it has a terrific chance to be forwarded to others.

Don’t Remind Us

You should never say. “Hey everyone. Sorry I haven’t made a post or done a blog in about a month. But I’m back! Here is what’s going on…”

85% of your fans probably did not notice you were gone, but you just told them. The other 15% of your fans that did notice you have been gone, but assumed that you are a busy author. That is a good thing!

Did mentioning you were gone for about a month relate to your target audience? No. Did this content interest or help your target audience? No. Does this content have a chance to be forwarded to others? Um…no. In fact, nobody really cares.

Blogging About Your Week Does Not Matter

Authors enjoy blogging about what they are doing. “I’m going to catch a plane this afternoon and head to New Jersey. This is the dreaded yearly tradition of getting all the family members together. The good news is that I’ll get to eat at all the restaurants that I miss ever so dearly. I’ll be back in a week and give you an update. Until then, TTFN.”

Did this content relate to your target audience? Did this content interest or help your target audience? Does this content have a chance to be forwarded to others?

No x 3 = 0 increased fans.

Updates Good, Advertising Bad

In theory, if you are writing great content for your target audience, you should not have to remind them that your book is on sale for $2.99 on Amazon. However, I suppose by following the three content rules, you could give everyone a friendly update.

Here are two examples. One is an update and the other is an advertisement.

Let’s say you write vampire books. Your posts and blogs over the last month have been about mission groups that are attempting to rid the world of vampires. Your book was released a month ago, but your sales are a little low. You decide to make a post.

“My terrific vampire thriller, Kill Them First, is being sold on Amazon for $2.99! Click on the link and get your copy today!”

This is pretty close to an advertisement, which is the old ways of doing things. Over the last month, you have been writing great content about your book, without actually telling your audience what your book is about. My advice is to stick with that plan.

“Alexandra leads another mission group to rid the world of vampires. Read their story in my latest book, Kill Them First, at Amazon for $2.99.”

First, notice we took out the exclamation marks. That shows you are not desperate. Also, you promoted your book by using the content that has been successfully leading up to the release of your book, rather than just telling everyone you have a book at Amazon.

With content, you are building a relationship with your target audience. The more your audience feels comfortable with you, the more books you will sell. Starting today, ask yourself three questions before writing a post, Tweet, or blog:

“Does this content relate to my target audience?”

“Will this content interest or help my target audience?”

“Does this content have a chance to be forwarded to others?”

Remember the most important advantage you have over all businesses, corporations, and marketing agencies in the world. You are an author. Content is your life.

Ron Knight 

www.authorronknight.com

Ron Knight

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